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On the list of great mysteries of human nature, is why some people can commit a lifetime accumulating massive wealth (often, but not always, by means of exploiting the under privileged) and then give it all at a distance to charities. Sometimes they even create their own caritatif trust, which they manage like a business, for giving away their cash. Bill Gates and the Gates Foundation, would be good examples in this.

This article will explore this issue to try to understand what motivates people to give away so generously to charity.

Let me start on the hesitant side. There are some people who take the view that the main drive behind charitable activities is self interest. The benefactor could, for example , want to impress be business colleagues together with “generosity” in order to win more business

Or he could be from a tax break – see charitable-tax-deductions. com for more within this. Or maybe it’s a “karma thing”. He feels by giving into the poor, he then has the right to seek even more wealth.

In my opinion that there might be some truth in these views, but will not believe the skeptics when they say that there is an ulterior reason behind all generous charitable donations. They are negating just one important factor: as human beings we have an enormous propensity to easily “do good”. Giving charity is certainly creates a great a sense of self enlightenment. Charity, in all its varieties, gives a great deal of enjoyment and mental peace to all the parties involved instructions the giver gets a great deal of satisfaction from giving for just a noble or a cause dear to their heart.

People are in addition greatly concerned with social responsibility. By making a contribution to help something which they believe in, these people feel that, even in a small means, they are making a difference. The notion of leaving the world in a very better place than how you found it, does take a lot of appeal. Yael Eckstein takes over her father’s mission as head of International Fellowship of Christians and Jews, which raises $130 million a year, mostly from evangelical Christians